ACURA TSX

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  • i know, dar sa vedem si preturi, presimt ceva destul de piperat
    2.0i 2005

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    • Originally posted by dio View Post
      i know, dar sa vedem si preturi, presimt ceva destul de piperat
      Pai tocmai din cauza preturilor n-o sa ne atingem de ele, motivul invocat de noi fiind de fapt: "consuma prea mult si nu-s nici ecologice"
      HONDA Accord

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      • 2010 Acura TSX V6 to debut at Vancouver auto show !

        http://www.canadiandriver.com/2009/0...-auto-show.htm

        Vancouver, British Columbia – Acura Canada announced that its all-new V6-powered TSX sports sedan will make its Canadian debut, Monday, March 30th at the Vancouver International Auto Show.

        Scheduled to go on sale later this summer, the new 2010 TSX V6 will be equipped with a powerful 280-horsepower 3.5-litre V6 engine, Sequential SportShift automatic transmission with steering-wheel mounted F1–style paddle shifters, unique suspension tuning, larger diameter wheels and additional enhancements. The V6-powered TSX will fill a niche in its line-up between the four-cylinder TSX and the new TL performance-luxury sedan, said the company.

        “Our new TSX V6 highlights the performance direction of Acura’s sedans with its improved acceleration and handling,” said Jerry Chenkin, executive vice president, Honda Canada. “The TSX V6 is an important step in the advancement of our Acura sedan line-up and in the continued enhancement of the Acura brand.”
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        • Dio, la cursul euro-dolar curent, estimez ca un TSX V6 il poti aduce la un pret de maxim 40.000 E cu tot cu TVA.

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          • Acura


            Review: 2009 Acura TSX!






            Honda’s luxury unit, Acura, takes a unique approach to the highly-competitive entry-level sports sedan market: Rather than directly taking on the obvious German and Japanese rivals, the automaker’s TSX sedan undercuts them on price, but not equipment or size, at the expense of underhood might.

            Newly redesigned for 2009, the second-generation TSX replaces a successful first attempt at offering a cut-rate BMW 3-Series that doesn’t give up nearly as much as its five-figure price difference might imply. We decided to take a look to see what all the fuss is about.

            What is it?

            By digging into the corporate parts bin and re-purposing the world-market Honda Accord as an upscale model for North America, Acura successfully tapped into a new segment of the market that the default-choice Germans had abandoned as they moved into pricier territory.
            For the second-generation model introduced earlier this year, the TSX grew a few inches in each direction and gained some much-needed interior room. Starting a little under $30,000 for the base model, it offers merely one option, a $3,100 Technology Package with an especially-advanced navigation system, a CD changer and an upgraded audio system. Stay out of the accessories department and you won’t drop more than $33,000 on a fully-loaded TSX like our tester. Visit a BMW, Mercedes-Benz or Infiniti dealer with that budget and they’ll direct you to their used car section.

            What’s it up against?

            The TSX’s rivals list reads like a Who’s Who of practical choices for decently well-heeled enthusiasts: The Audi A4 2.0T, BMW 328i, Cadillac CTS, Lexus IS 250, Mercedes-Benz C300, Saab 9-3 2.0T and Volvo S40 T5.
            Until Audi, Ford and GM jacked up A4, S40 and 9-3 prices for 2009, they were the TSX’s most obvious rivals because of their four-cylinder powertrains (five in the S40) and standard front-wheel-drive. The rest of the TSX’s rivals offer bigger engines and rear-wheel-drive.

            Any breakthroughs?


            With the optional Technology Package, you gain an advanced navigation system that, unfortunately, uses a complex control and a low-resolution screen. It does feature voice-activation and a reverse camera, nice and unexpected treats for the segment.
            But the real treat is the ELS audio system, with 10-speakers and DVD audio capability: Without a doubt, it’s one of the best we’ve encountered, eagerly replicating highs and lows in ways that tickled our ears.

            How does it look?

            Crisp and toned, the TSX doesn’t deviate heavily from its predecessor. From some angles, it is a bit more bulbous than before, but the overall appearance is deceiving: The TSX doesn’t look as big as its 186-inch overall length might imply.
            Acura toned down its new corporate snout for the TSX and we think you’ll agree that beak-like matte-silver trim that surrounds the prominent grille badge looks way better integrated here than it does on the TL.
            There’s really little to complain about with the TSX’s exterior; it neither offends nor especially excites, which won’t keep people away from showrooms like some more extravagant designs might. It’s a safe, conservative design that works well for this segment.

            And on the inside?

            Your grandmother won’t like it, but if you’re part of the iPhone generation – or, heck, even the Zach Morris cellular phone generation – you’ll feel right at home inside the TSX. The TSX’s center stack is a button fest reminiscent of the laptop you thought you’d left at work, and though it proves daunting at first, there’s an owner’s manual the size of the Lonely Planet guide to the Europe that helps iron out your concerns.
            In sunlight, the navigation display and the thin display for the climate and radio display wash out entirely. A non-reflective surface seems like a no-brainer to us, but maybe it’s cloudy all of the time at Acura’s North American headquarters in Southern California. No, probably not.
            But things improve dramatically from there. Materials are top-notch all around, even if they don’t quite approach the finely-crafted feel of the class leaders. There’s no glossy wood trim here; in its place, you’ll find painted plastic that reveals the TSX’s lower cost of entry, but we don’t see that as a demerit. We were most impressed by the solid, circa-1980 Mercedes-Benz-like “thunk” you hear when you close the doors – a nice touch that adds to the feeling of quality evident throughout.
            Standard perforated leather seats are sports-car grippy, though we found there to be too much lumbar even with the standard adjustment turned all the way down. The leather covering the seats and the three-spoke steering wheel felt especially nice, though. That wheel is home to a pair of plastic paddle shifters on automatic-transmission TSXs – like our tester – as well as a whole host of redundant controls to help keep your hands away from the center stack.
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            • But does it go?

              On paper, with just a tick over 200 horsepower on tap – 201, peaking at a wild 7,000 rpm – the TSX is certainly down on power compared to its pricier rivals. And its mere 172 lb-ft. of torque at 4,400 rpm doesn’t help matters. Further, it tips the scales at 3,417 lbs., a linebacker or so more than the lithe Germans. Things aren’t looking good.
              But then you turn the key.
              Yet the TSX still manages to feel quite spritely despite the fairly modest specs for this class, especially keeping in mind that when the current BMW 3-Series was introduced in 2006, the entry-level (for the U.S.-market) 325i put out 215-horsepower, or that the 323i still offered in the Canadian market offers an even 200 ponies. The TSX isn’t down by much.
              The 2.4-liter inline-four cylinder is buttery smooth at idle and happily revved all the way up to its 7,100 rpm redline. Drivers used to the low-end torque of a larger-displacement motor, or a turbocharged motor in a Saab or Audi, will find there’s a bit to get used to with the tach needle’s desire to tickle the far end of its range. Performance isn’t blistering off the line, but above 3,000 rpm, the TSX is certainly class-competitive. It won’t struggle to merge or pass, it just won’t quite do it with the alacrity some buyers might expect in this segment.
              Even with all this revving, we averaged a solid 24.5 mpg over a week of mixed driving. That’s about right, given the 21/30 city/highway rating the EPA gives automatic-transmission models, making the TSX among the most efficient in its class.
              The five-speed automatic (a six-cog manual is a no-cost option) furnished smooth, prompt shifts, though its sport mode – pull the stubby lever all the way back – was a little reluctant to shift into fifth gear at highway speeds. Consider it best for around-town performance runs or country roads.
              It’s in those country roads where the TSX really shows off. Torque steer is negligible thanks to nicely-weighted steering that wasn’t overly eager to return to center. The TSX’s stiff chassis and compliant suspension smothered bumps while keeping the car firmly planted on the road, making it a genuine joy to throw around on curvy roads. It doesn’t let you forget it is a front-wheel-drive vehicle, but it comes closer than almost anything we’ve driven. There’s not quite the tossability of the Saab 9-3 here, but the TSX is tighter and more balanced, making it a more fun-to-drive car overall.

              Why you would buy it:

              An equivalent BMW 328i will set you back at least an additional $10,000. Besides, the TSX offers few, if any, compromises, as well as its own unique flavor.

              Why you wouldn’t:

              You’re a bird and you love the big brother TL’s beak, or you’re so brand-conscious that a non-German sedan just won’t cut it. Get real, man.

              Leftlane’s bottom line

              No, the TSX isn’t quite as complete as the BMW 3-Series or the Audi A4 2.0T. But it sure is close – and it offers a personality all its own. It’s a fresher design than the Saab 9-3 or Volvo S40 that, in these penny-pinching times, makes a lot of sense for those looking to step out of a more-established luxury design without losing much. The TSX is an intelligent choice made better for 2009.

              2009 Acura TSX Technology Package base price, $32,060. As tested, $32,820.
              Destionation, $760.

              Words and photos by Andrew Ganz.

              http://www.leftlanenews.com/acura-tsx-review.html
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              • The Acura TSX Navigation System !

                http://reviews.cnet.com/8301-13746_7-10223717-48.html

                was just talking to my brother in New Jersey about how I was focusing my Car Tech blog on web videos featuring emerging car navigation technology. He asks me, "Well, what's available and/or new for Acura?" (incidentally, this is the type of car he drives to and from Rutgers 40 minutes each way). I decided to search for videos dealing with car navigation systems for Acuras, and sure enough I found a clip featuring the Acura TSX in-dash Navigation system.



                The Acura TSX is one of Acura's newer luxury sports sedan models. While the car itself is mighty fine, the 2009 edition boasts a superb hands-free, voice-activated navigation system. This little sucker does more than just give you step-by-step directions to virtually any destination in the U.S., it can locate a whole bunch of other stuff too - service stations, banks, restaurants and damn near anything else you might be looking for when out on the road. The 2009 Acura TSX can also garner traffic conditions for your destination in case of any preferred or necessary re-routing. In my opinion, based on the video and other information available, this seems to be one of the more handy in-car nav systems available.
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                • Cica:

                  Official pricing on the 2010 TSX V6:
                  Base $35,660 with destination
                  TECH $38,760 with destination.

                  TL V6 3.5 FWD Base $34,955
                  TL V6 3.5 FWD Tech $38,685

                  Prin urmare, TSX V6 mai scump decat TL fara SH-AWD, ambele cu acelasi motor, TSX fiind mai mica...peste 5000 E in plus fata de versiunea cu 4 cilindrii.

                  Sincer, logica asta imi scapa...

                  De curiozitate, m-am uitat la BMW USA...intre seria 3 sedan 335 si seria 5 sedan 535 este o diferenta de 10.000$ la varianta de baza, la seria 3 fiind motorizarea de top, iar la seria 5 fiind motorizarea de mijloc.
                  M-am uitat si la Lexus, GS vs ES (am zis sa iau ES ca na, e ceva mai mare decat un IS, cam cat e un TSX)...acelasi lucru. Ce-i la una top e la cealalta baza, iar diferenta de pret de plecare tot in jurul a 10.000$ este.
                  Am zis ca e coincidenta, asa ca am aruncat o privire si la Infiniti...mai sa fie, la fel, intre G si M aceeasi diferenta (si intre ele chiar e o diferenta mica ca si dimensiuni).

                  As avea si eu o nelamurire: cumva la sediul Acura se distribuie marijuana legal?

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                  • 2010 Acura TSX V6 Test Drive: 280 hp Sport Sedan is Transformed !

                    http://www.popularmechanics.com/blog...html?nav=RSS20

                    LOS ANGELES–As sprightly and as poised as the four-cylinder Acura TSX is, a quick scan of the spec sheet would probably send torque junkies to more powerful pastures. That car has just 201 hp and 170 lb.-ft. of torque–not exactly the stuff of our 1/4-mile dreams. Well, Acura decided that the TSX could use a bit more muscle under the hood too. So iit has added a new model to the lineup and shoehorned the 280 hp V6 from the Acura TL sedan into the TSX's smaller package. The result? Perhaps our favorite sedan in the Acura lineup. –Ben Stewart


                    The Specs

                    The V6-powered, 3,600 pound TSX is fundamentally the same car as the four-cylinder model–both are based on the European Honda Accord. The only cues that this car has two more cylinders under the hood are the functional air intakes next to the fog lights, new wheels and that little V6 badge on the trunk. Under the skin, engineers fitted what is essentially the 3.5-liter V6 from the base-level Acura TL paired to a 5-speed automatic controlled by steering wheel paddle shifters. Thanks to the 11.2:1 compression ratio, and tech like VTEC variable valve timing and lift, and a magnesium dual stage intake manifold, the V6 makes 280 hp at 6200 rpm and 254 lb.-ft. of torque at 5000 rpm. The V6 is rated at 18-mpg city and 27-mpg highway, which isn't too far off the four cylinder TSX that is rated at 21-mpg city and 30 mpg highway.

                    Beyond the engine transplant, V6 models get firmer springs and dampers to compensate for the 210 lb weight increase over a four-cylinder automatic TSX. The brake system (11.8-inch front discs and 11.1-inch rear discs) gains a new brake booster, larger master cylinder and new rear brake pads. Wheels have been upgraded to 18X8-inch and tires grow to 235/45R18 over the 225/50R17s on four-cylinder TSX sedans. The electric power steering system has been re-tuned for V6 duty as well.

                    Inside, the TSX V6 comes with a long list of standard features including a leather steering wheel and heated leather power seats, a 7-speaker 360 watt sound system, USB port connectivity for iPods and iPhones or a removable memory stick. But the smartest standard system on the TSX V6 is the new Active Sound Control, which decreases engine boom noise below 2000 rpm as well as high frequency noise during engine cruising. The system uses mics strategically placed in the cabin to determine the sound level and then decides when and how much noise-cancelling sound (inaudible to the driver) it should pump through the sound system to mute the bad stuff. According to John Watts, Acura's Sr. Manager of Product Planning, the system not only effectively quiets the cabin but it does so with less weight gain to the car than adding additional sound deadening material would. Opt for the Technology package and you'll get a navigation system with rearview camera, dual-zone climate control and a 10-speaker, 415-watt audio system.


                    The Drive

                    Plant your right foot in a four-cylinder TSX and you'll wait until the tachometer hits high noon before you feel the grunt of the motor. Flat-out, the four-cylinder isn't slow, it's just not sport sedan quick. The experience in the TSX V6 is markedly different. The V6 model leaves the line with a torquey thrust as the steering wheel dances in your grip ever so slightly and the traction control attempts to limit wheelspin. It's quick. Acura says the V6 TSX will hit 60 mph in around 7 seconds, but it feels quicker–especially after driving a four-cylinder TSX.

                    On our drive through some of the best roads in the Santa Monica Mountains we noticed the steering feels a bit heavier and a touch quicker than the four-cylinder TSX too. And that, along with the additional weight makes the car feel more substantial. The TSX V6 drives a lot like the previous generation TL. And since the new TL has grown slightly from its predecessor, some Acura loyalists might view this TSX as it's proper successor. Bend the TSX into a tight corner or a gentle sweeper and this sedan generates serious smiles. And that's really what separates a good sport sedan from an average one. Did you enjoy the last 17 hairpin turns, or did it seem like work? The Acura TSX V6 is quite fun to drive hard.

                    The V6 experience is also more serene than the base model TSX. The four-cylinder car generates a fair amount of engine noise when it's working hard. But the V6 is smooth and comparatively silent. There's enough exhaust note to let you know it's a six. But don't expect to hear a sonorous wail comparable to a V6 Infiniti. Perhaps Acura will offer a Type-S model with a more vocal exhaust note.


                    The Bottom Line

                    When Acura launched the new TSX last year, many speculated that there would be two optional engines–and both of them would be four-cylinder. The 2.3-liter, 240 hp turbocharged four-cylinder from the RDX seemed like one powerplant Acura would choose. However Acura's Watts mentioned to us that not only did this engine not fit into the bay of the TSX without serious modification, but its fuel economy hasn't been as good as the company had hoped and wouldn't deliver the consumption consumers would expect in sedan like the TSX.


                    Speaking of fuel consumption, Acura had announced that it would include a diesel option in its lineup soon. And since the European Accord comes with a diesel option, the plan was to use the 148 hp 2.2-liter i-DTEC diesel in the TSX too. With consumer demand for diesel in state of flux due to fluctuating fuel prices and the still-nagging perception among US buyers that diesels are either dirty or noisy, Acura has decided to wait. However, Watts eluded to the fact that if the company perceived a stable demand, a diesel TSX could move into the product plan relatively quickly.

                    The 2010 Acura TSX four-cylinder starts at $30,120 and the V6 model begins at $35,660. That extra five grand is no small sum in this economy. But the larger, smoother engine does make the TSX a more compelling sport sedan. And even at its fully loaded $38,760 price point, the V6 model still undercuts many of its competitors. Now if we could only get that diesel option too.

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                    • Acura TSX gets power boost with V6 transplant !

                      http://www.autoweek.com/article/2009...IEWS/906059995

                      The formula for making a muscle car was established 46 years ago, when John Z. DeLorean dropped a 389 where a 326 had been and created the first GTO. That simple Frankenstinian act has been followed ever since by a parade of great brutes. We have loved them all.
                      So when Acura set out to expand its TSX line, it did just what DeLorean did 46 years before. In this case, engineers took the 3.5-liter V6 from the TL and wedged it into the smaller, lighter TSX. You can still get a 2.0-liter four-cylinder TSX, but you now have the choice of a bigger, badder powertrain.
                      The power output rises from 201 hp to 280 hp, while weight goes up by 210 pounds. Acura claims the new setup will lower 0-to-60-mph times by two seconds to 7.0 seconds, a figure Acura called "conservative." Your performance may vary.
                      There are drawbacks. Fuel economy drops to 21 mpg combined, something you might not expect for the smallest car in the Acura line. While the four-cylinder gets a six-speed manual or five-speed automatic, the TSX V6 comes with just the slushbox.
                      The cost will reel you back a few feet too, at $35,660, compared with $30,120 for the four-cylinder TSX. But the power may be worth the five and a half grand.
                      We drove a TSX V6 through the best roads of the Santa Monica mountains and did enjoy the extra horses. Though there was nowhere on our drive to test the 0-to-60 figure, it seemed highly plausible--indeed, conservative.
                      The five-speed automatic has the requisite shifter paddles behind the wheel for that boy-racer feel. Shifts came as quickly as any touring-car champion is ever going to want, and if you drop the console-mounted shift lever down all the way to S, the engine stays in gear no matter what, bouncing off the 6,800-rpm rev limiter all day if you so choose. On the best of the twisties, we flipped the paddles with glee and no complaints.
                      Whatever shortcomings we noted on our short drive might have been a result of our higher expectations. The electric steering was quick but not as communicative as we'd have liked and didn't deliver the same feel offered by, say, a 3-series. Springs are revised, but only enough to hold the extra 200 pounds. The front antiroll bar is also tuned for the added weight. The V6 model comes with 18-inch wheels instead of the 17s found on the four. Tires are 235/45 Michelin Pilot HX MXM4s.
                      The brakes feature the same diameter discs but get a new master cylinder and new rear pads. They, too, lacked the same feel we would have liked on a performance sedan. Going into fast corners, they didn't feel like they were grabbing those discs like a sport sedan should. Stopping distances felt longer than we might have expected.
                      This might not matter except that Acura compares its TSX V6 with the best performance sedans of this size on the market. If we were to put the car into a performance comparison with the Lexus IS 350 and an appropriate BMW 3-series, we'd have to place the TSX third. The TSX does start life out as a European Accord, remember. So maybe we were expecting too much.
                      And will any of that matter to the TSX V6's buyers? Maybe not. There are electronics galore on the features list, everything from navigation with real-time traffic (which Acura pioneered, by the way) to a whopping-good 415-watt, 10-speaker audio system with active sound control. The V6 buyer is expected to be seven years older than the four-cylinder buyer, so maybe this car is just right for them. Even Acura ultimately calls the V6 model a "performance-oriented sports sedan" and not a touring-car championship racer.

                      As always, the market will decide what it is when the car arrives in showrooms. This one comes in July.
                      SPECS:

                      2010 Acura TSX V6

                      On sale: July
                      Base price: $35,660
                      Drivetrain: 3.5-liter, 280-hp, 254-lb-ft V6; FWD, five-speed automatic
                      Curb weight: 3,680 lb
                      0-60 MPH: 7 sec (mfr)

                      Fuel economy (EPA): 21 mpg
                      To read more visit the AutoWeek Car Reviews for new cars, trucks, SUVs, vans and crossovers section.
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                      • 2010 Acura TSX V6 - First Drive Review !

                        http://www.caranddriver.com/reviews/...t_drive_review

                        Around here, we are all big fans of the Acura TSX—the lean, frisky, three-time-10Best-winning, first-generation version, anyway. With respect to the larger, more substantial second-gen 2009 TSX introduced just last year, our camp is split. Some of us believe that even despite the car’s newer and larger (but just 130-pound-heavier) body, the high-revving 201-hp, 2.4-liter four-cylinder carried over is still a great match, offering an excellent blend of power and prudence, especially with the available six-speed manual. The rest believe that along with the newfound size and substance, Acura should have added a heap of horsepower—and rear- or all-wheel drive.
                        In regards to the former group, nothing has changed on the four-cylinder TSX for 2010: it’s still the happy, front-drive, near-luxe sedan it’s always been. For the power-hungry bunch, the 2010 TSX V-6 will alleviate the horsepower deficit when it goes on sale in July. By slipping in the same, 3.5-liter V-6 from the base TL—tuned in the TSX to 280 hp and 254 lb-ft of torque—Acura turns its smallest four-door into a very quick sports sedan, even if it comes only with a paddle-shifted, five-speed automatic transmission.
                        Specifications


                        VEHICLE TYPE: front-engine, front-wheel-drive, 5-passenger, 4-door sedan

                        BASE PRICE: $35,660

                        ENGINE TYPE: SOHC 24-valve V-6, aluminum block and heads, port fuel injection
                        Displacement: 212 cu in, 3471cc
                        Power (SAE net): 280 bhp @ 6200 rpm
                        Torque (SAE net): 254 lb-ft @ 5000 rpm

                        TRANSMISSION: 5-speed automatic with manumatic shifting

                        DIMENSIONS:
                        Wheelbase: 106.4 in Length: 185.6 in Width: 72.4 in Height: 56.7 in Curb weight (C/D est): 3650 lb

                        PERFORMANCE (C/D EST):
                        Zero to 60 mph: 6.0 sec
                        Standing ¼-mile: 14.6 sec
                        FUEL ECONOMY:
                        EPA city/highway driving: 18/27 mpg



                        How quick is it? Well, we’ll have to wait until we track test it to say for certain. Acura says it is capable of hitting 60 mph in seven seconds. But considering we hit 60 in 6.7 seconds with the last manual-equipped four-cylinder TSX we tested, we’re sure Acura is waaaaaay off with that silly estimate. Stay tuned.
                        Keep Your Hands on the Wheel
                        But alas, as the saying goes, with power comes responsibility. And in this case, the driver must be responsible for managing the V-6 model’s extra thrust—and 200-plus pounds of additional beef, most of which takes up residence over the front wheels. With its 62/38-percent front-to-rear weight distribution, this is a recipe for eminent understeer. And sure enough, our preview drive on some of the most challenging mountain roads through Malibu, California—with almost no runoff room and very few guardrails—provided us with more than a few intestine-twisting moments. We came to realize that the V-6 model truly isn’t as tossable as the four-cylinder, despite Acura’s fitment of flared-spoke 18-inch wheels (one inch larger than those on the four-banger) and firmer front shocks. Torque steer, however, is very well managed considering how much power is being dumped upon the front axle. After all, the front tires have to steer, too.
                        The brakes were also worked up a bit, with a new master cylinder, brake booster, and uprated rear brake pads. The pedal, however, still exhibited some slop in the first inch or so of travel, and that only got worse during our admittedly harsh flogging. We also saw considerable fade. In every other respect, however, the TSX is unchanged. The only exterior alterations involve the aforementioned wheels, a slightly revised front fascia and the V-6 badge on the trunk. Inside, other than a new active noise-cancellation system, there is no difference whatsoever. And that’s just fine with us: the comfortable, spacious and exceedingly well equipped interior is one of the TSX’s strongest suits, especially dressed in a dark color and equipped with the Tech package and its solar-sensing climate-control system, 10-speaker ELS surround-sound stereo, and navigation with real-time traffic reporting.
                        Steep Price for Power
                        Well, there is one more difference: price. At $35,660, the TSX V-6 will cost a monstrous $5,540 more than the $30,120 2010 TSX four-cylinder that’s available now. That’s right, two extra cylinders will run a guy nearly $2,800 each. That’s especially notable given that the TSX has proven that it can do its job just fine with the four it was born with, to say nothing of that engine’s clear fuel economy advantage (21 city/30 highway mpg versus 18/27).
                        Hmmm. So how much is all that power—and understeer—really worth to ya?

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                        • First Drive: 2010 Acura TSX V6 offers more power, performance... more car

                          http://www.autoblog.com/2009/06/09/f...r-performance/

                          by Jonathon Ramsey on Jun 9th 2009 at 11:58AM

                          2010 Acura TSX V6 – Click above for high-res image gallery


                          Acura has a good thing going in the luxury segment. Unlike Mercedes-Benz, BMW, and Audi – but like Lexus – Acura's best selling car is not its entry-level model: Acura moves more TLs than anything else in its line-up. And unlike those other brands, Lexus included, all of Acura's offerings carry five-star safety ratings from NHTSA, are rated as top safety picks by the IIHS, and the Automotive Lease Guide has declared that Acura offerings have the best resale value among luxury brands. Now, Honda's premium division has grown by one with the addition of the TSX V6, and Autoblog was invited to find out if the new, more powerful sedan could keep the brand's good thing going. Follow the jump to find out.




                          • The TSX V6 was engineered to fill the gap between the four-cylinder TSX and the relatively new TL. With the latest TL having gone upmarket in several areas, Acura felt there was enough space between its entry and mid-market lines to offer a stepping stone between the two. But this wasn't strictly about plopping a V6 into a TSX and adding some bigger digits after the dollar sign. According to officials, this car is about creating a more comprehensively sporting version of the TSX, yet one that wouldn't trod on the bumper of the TL.


                          If you're familiar with the 2009 TSX that was introduced last year, then you're up-to-speed on the TSX V6's exterior; there were essentially no changes made to the car beyond larger wheels, a V6 badge on the trunk and a different compound on the rear brakes. Even the dual tailpipes are the same size on both cars, and there are no interior changes – not one – to differentiate the four-pot from the sixer. Acura decided the V6's buyers were looking for sport package identity, they simply wanted more power. So, as with the bionic man, this is an operation to be felt, not seen.



                          But in Acura's estimation, this is also a car meant to truly compete with the A4, 3 Series, and C-Class. The 2.4-liter four-cylinder in the base TSX has 201 horsepower and 170 lb-ft of torque, leaving it ten horses and 88 lb-ft down versus Audi's 2.0-liter four. The 3.5-liter V6 in the TSX boosts its numbers to 280 hp and 254 lb-ft, giving it better outputs than the sixers in the Mercedes C350 and Audi A4 3.2, figures bested only by the BMW 335i – and it shades all of them by a hair in the fuel consumption stakes.

                          As stated, Acura didn't do anything to the interior, but it still deserves mention. Overall, the inside offers a placid view and the designers have done a good job of providing visual variety. There are plenty of contrasting curves, overlaid with four different plastics treatments throughout and perforated leather inserts in the doors. It won't grab you by the heart when you take a seat, but it ought to age well – a trait that seems too rare in the luxury segment. (something that would go some way toward explaining that resale value...)



                          The seats remain wide and comfy. Strikingly, compared to the skinny seatbacks becoming au courant among smaller luxury cars, the side of the seat is thicker than a brick wall. Rear legroom doesn't appear to be compromised since it's only the bolsters that create the bulk, but it did come as a surprise.

                          As for another detail of the interior: we appear to be alone in this, but the dash feels awash in buttons. The steering wheel has 11 buttons on it, seven of them multi-function. The center stack is a button convention with two multi-function knobs as special guests. We're sure it wouldn't take much to adapt and find our go-to buttons, but the initial cockpit survey leads us to think Airbus, not Acura.

                          Still, none of that is any deterrent to enjoying the car. Besides, in this league, it's the driving that counts.



                          Acura's assertion that this wasn't just about more power but about creating a sportier car is backed up in every way. In our review of the four-cylinder TSX, the engine was said to be "sufficient, but still lacks real grunt," and the car was described as doing "its job without much fuss, but never gets your adrenaline pumping."

                          Not so in the TSX V6. Although the V6 model gains an additional 194 pounds, the additional horsepower and torque offsets the extra poundage. Lay on the gas from a stop in the base TSX and the car aspires to action. In the V6, you only get the action.



                          The new coil springs and damper settings fore and aft do a terrific job of keeping road harshness away from cabin occupants. They're aided in the quest for cabin quietude by electronically controlled engine mounts and a feature only available on the V6: Active Sound Control (ASC), a noise cancellation system that filters out certain frequencies.

                          If you tell a group of automotive scribes that you've engineered a sedan for sporty performance and let them loose in twisties, they will, without fail, beat the bejeezus out of it to redline, smoking brakes and beyond, then compare it to the platonic ideal of a rear-drive BMW. Put through that tried-and-true test, the front-drive Acura fares well. Going hot and heavy into a hairpin will get you a serving of understeer and a flashing yellow triangle while the traction control works to keep the ship righted. But we were delighted to find that the flashing yellow light was the most intrusive part of the TC – no piercing whistles, no dominatrix-like clampdown on the brakes, no sudden wondering "Where did the power go?" It was always just enough to keep you going over the road and not over the cliff.



                          The electronic power steering returned decent feedback. Most importantly, we always knew where to put the wheel when planning a line, and corrections weren't necessary when we laid the course. The suspension kept to its tasks just as well when flying as it did at town speeds, keeping all the wheels where they needed to be even as the car was squatting and flicking to stay in its lane. The brakes did get tired a bit early. They were fine all the way up and over the mountain, but there was a gradual yet noticeable fade while plugging through corners. Not surprisingly, when we exited the car, the tangy scent of hot brakes was heavy in the air.

                          However, few of this TSX's drivers will ever belt this car like it's a Belmont Stakes runner. And if you are looking for a ride to do your Crank imitation of Jason Statham... you shouldn't be looking at a TSX anyhow.



                          Back here on Earth, and off the Hollywood set, the TSX V6 comes good with just about everything you'd want from it. The drive-by-wire throttle that feels like instant-on acceleration at low speeds loosens up nicely on the trot. The five-speed automatic (no manual option on this car) knows its gears and isn't afraid to kick down, and the extra power pulls the TSX nicely out of apexes. Even though there's a manual shifting mode with paddles on the steering wheel, we barely used it and rarely called on peak horsepower. The latter doesn't come on until 6,200 rpm, just 700 rpm shy of the redline, and at that height, even the ASC can't keep the cabin from becoming vociferous.

                          The grabby brakes loosen up as well – which is as much down to fade as anything else when it's really hard going. But maintain a rhythm, don't stab at the stoppers like a serial killer, and they'll serve you well.



                          In short: drive this car like it's a TSX with more power and better dynamics – not like it's a Lotus Elise – and you'll get a fabulously put together package that comes standard with a bucket of kit. If you want a TSX with more power, you've got that and more with this model. And if you're looking for an Acura that handles enthusiastically enough to seriously play on the same pitch as the three gatekeepers of the entry-level premium segment (3, C, and A), here you are. And you'll get it for less coin than those other cars: base base MSRP is $34,850 plus $810 destination and, if you're game, $3,100 for the Technology Package. That money will also save you money: you'll get better gas mileage than those other cars as well.

                          If that isn't how you keep a good thing going, then we don't know what is...
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                          • Road Tests

                            2010 Acura TSX V6 Full Test and Video !


                            http://www.edmunds.com/insideline/do...ticleId=150767

                            Speed Read

                            Vehicle Tested:

                            2010 Acura TSX 4dr Sedan w/Technology Package (3.5L 6cyl 5A)
                            MSRP of Test Vehicle: $37,850 Price It!!

                            What Works:

                            Responsive power; spacious, stylish interior; exceptional audio and navigation system.

                            What Needs Work:

                            Dispiriting dynamics; dispiriting exterior style.

                            Bottom Line:

                            Built for the American road.

                            Featured Specs
                            • 280 hp; 254 lb-ft of torque
                            • 3.5-liter V6
                            • 5-speed automatic transmission
                            • 18-inch 45-series tires




                            Edmunds.com Pricing

                            The American Car



                            By Michael Jordan, Executive Editor Email
                            Date posted: 06-17-2009


                            The 2010 Acura TSX V6 is really an American car. It's so American that it works better with a 3.5-liter V6 engine than it does with its 2.4-liter inline-4, which is kind of a surprise for a car that comes from Honda by way of its premium car division.
                            Yet the addition of the V6 seems to make a huge difference in the TSX, a makeover both mechanical and conceptual for this sport sedan, which has seemed kind of underwhelming since the 2009 Acura TSX with its inline-4 engine first came to us late last year.

                            No Japanese company has worked as hard as Honda to make itself over as an American outfit. Honda has lots of assembly factories in the U.S. just like every other Japanese-label company, but a huge part of the company's engineering brain trust is here as well. You'll find most of it in Ohio, which Soichiro Honda himself picked as the site of his American industrial base because of the profound respect he had for the quality of the American machine tools he bought from the region for his little motorcycle company during the 1950s.
                            So maybe it's no surprise that the 2010 Acura TSX V6 is the most American of the cars from Honda.

                            Everything Is Bigger in America:

                            As we've learned, the second-generation TSX is not like the first-generation car, which was an Accord that had been shrink-wrapped to a sporting size for the European market. The TSX's roots still are in the Accord, but it's the new-generation Accord, which is far more of a full-size sedan meant for rolling across those amber waves of grain on the American highway.
                            Of course, a lot of this is in our head, since the new TSX's wheelbase is only 1.3 inches longer than before while its overall length is just 2.8 inches longer. And yet there's something that seems oversize about this new TSX when we catch sight of it out of the corner of our eye. There are some benefits, though, as the 2010 Acura TSX suits not just a full-size country but also full-size people, measuring out to 94.5 cubic feet of passenger volume.
                            If you are looking for an ideal-size car for everyday driving on the American road, this would be it. And although the cues of Acura's Keen Edge styling vocabulary continue to strike us as faintly disagreeable, the overall effect here is fairly pleasant — modern without being memorable. You know, like an American car.

                            How About a Little Zip?

                            Though the premise of the TSX has rested upon a small-displacement inline-4 that asked for the courage to challenge the redline if you wanted peak performance, this same personality has limited the car's appeal to Americans. And now that the TSX has reached full-size dimensions, the 201-horsepower 2.4-liter Honda inline-4 feels like it's overmatched, droning unpleasantly even as it gives the new TSX marginally faster performance than the old one. This four-cylinder engine works fine, but it isn't leading a happy life.
                            So no one should be surprised that the addition of the 3.5-liter Acura V6 wakes the TSX right up. With 280 hp on tap at just 6,200 rpm, this engine isn't going to excite many Honda enthusiasts. Yet the V6's 254 pound-feet of torque is enough to pull the fairly prosaic, wide-ratio five-speed automatic transmission (it's a fuel economy thing, of course) with surprising authority.
                            At the test track, this translates to acceleration to 60 mph from a standstill in 6.4 seconds (6.1 seconds with 1 foot of rollout like on a drag strip) with hardly a whiff of wheelspin from the front tires even when the stability control has been disengaged. The quarter-mile arrives in 14.7 seconds at 96.6 mph.
                            None of this gets your attention until you find yourself on a road where you'd never take rear-seat passengers unless you were planning a focus group for evaluating the cause and affect of carsickness. Then you'll discover a razor-sharp character in this V6 that makes it a total delight while you're using the shift paddles on the steering wheel.
                            A tall 11.2:1 compression ratio, variable valve timing and a sophisticated throttle map account for a lot of the V6's goodness, and the typical light-flywheel effect of a Honda-engineered motor also makes a difference, as this V6 climbs the rpm scale with fairly thrilling quickness. Moreover, the transmission lets you hold a gear to redline while in Sport mode, and it doesn't get confused and default to automatic mode if it thinks you're not paying attention.

                            Playland at the Beach:

                            Probably this infatuation with power accounted for our foolish overconfidence as we crested the Santa Monica Mountains on Stunt Road and looked down the narrow, twisting chute of Latigo Canyon Road as it fell toward the beach in Malibu. As with every roller-coaster ride, we came to our senses just a few seconds too late as we headed irrevocably down the first steep pitch.
                            Had we been in the standard 2010 Acura TSX with its inline-4, it might have been a potentially disastrous ride, as that iteration of the TSX feels clumsy and uncertain in situations like this. In comparison, the TSX V6 feels transformed, as if it had morphed into the last-generation Acura TL (you remember, the good-looking one), which it resembles in size. The TSX V6 carves up the corners while remaining poised on its suspension, feeling lively without being out of control. It's adept, if not exactly a hard-core sport sedan.
                            You don't quite see this potential when it comes to our usual handling tests, as the TSX V6 registers just 0.84g on the skid pad, the slalom passes in 65.1 mph and it takes 133 feet to bring it to a halt from 60 mph. Yet the overall effect of the chassis changes for the TSX V6 adds up to more than the sum of the parts. First, the 235/45R18 Michelin Pilot HX MXM4 all-season tires make up in handling balance what they lack in overall grip. Then the slightly more aggressive rates for the springs and dampers plus a fractionally stiffer front antiroll bar (meant to compensate for the V6 car's added 200 pounds over the TSX four-cylinder) all manage to keep the suspension from plunging to its bumpstops in the corners.
                            Even the recalibrated electric-assist power steering isn't too bad, providing accurate action and furnishing a reassuring amount of effort even though it's not exactly talkative about what's happening to the tires. And we even managed to keep the TSX V6's brakes from catching on fire — always a possibility when you're going downhill on Latigo Canyon Road.

                            Motoring in the American Way:

                            The 2010 Acura TSX V6 has its American car thing pretty together on the highway. It's pretty comfortable, pretty composed and pretty undemanding. Yet like the TSX four-cylinder, it has a peculiar mix of soggy damping at low speeds that lets the car bob and weave more than it should, while the suspension calibration at freeway speed feels too lively, as if someone had put 80 psi of air in the tires. The TSX V6's added weight over the four-cylinder settles the car a bit, but the chassis still seems slightly unfinished, as if someone had sent its ride-and-handling engineers into exile before the job was done. Plenty of road noise doesn't help things, either.
                            So probably it's a good thing that the interior of the TSX is such a fine place to be. Even as its premium-label competition tries hard to bring more style to the interior of their cars, Acura continues to make a stronger statement with simple, strong function. The Honda-style format for the driving position continues to give you a comfortable sense of control enhanced by great visibility, and the TSX's seats are just terrific. We've come to like the layout of the center stack controls, while the voice-activated navigation system with real-time traffic information continues to set the standard for intuitive use. And the DVD-audio capability of the ELS audio system puts a lot of fancier labels to shame.

                            American Acura:

                            The 2010 Acura TSX V6 will make up about 20 percent of the TSX mix, and Honda says that since most TSX buyers live in urban areas, there's no demand for a manual-transmission option. And since the TSX V6 seems suited to an everyday life on the American road, we'd have to agree. It's a nice car, and it comes from the Acura division's urgent need to expand its American audience, as its Euro-theme cars like the previous-generation TSX have been greeted with deafening indifference.
                            Yet this change in the character of the Acura TSX comes just as the changing economy is making all of us appreciate the traditional Honda-style values of the Acura brand — efficiency, practicality and affordability. The TSX seems one bounce behind current events, more American just as European values gain greater currency. It's bigger, fancier and more comfortable just when smaller, smarter and more personal is what we want. It should be the Acura TSX — not the Audi A4 — that makes a four-cylinder sedan seem like the best car in the world.
                            When Honda and Acura vehicles were first introduced, the hope was that they would change American car buyers. With the introduction of the V6-powered TSX, it looks as if Americans have instead changed Honda.
                            The manufacturer provided Edmunds this vehicle for the purposes of evaluation.




                            Second Opinion:



                            Chief Road Test Editor Chris Walton says:

                            I have to admit I was more than a little disappointed after my first drive and subsequent testing of the all-new TSX last year. Compared to the classically proportioned, neat-as-a-pin style of the car it replaced, the new look came off as forced and none too handsome.
                            What's more, the dynamics felt watered-down and the driving experience was far more distant. The four-cylinder car I drove felt labored, the brakes faded noticeably and the road noise wasn't appropriately isolated for a luxury-branded car. Moreover, the TSX had lost the one quality that made people like me recommend it to friends and acquaintances and audiences like you: feel.
                            That's why I'm pleased to say that Acura seems to have taken at least some of these criticisms seriously. While the slab-sided, corporate-grilled styling remains for 2010, the barely adequate engine and electric steering issues have been addressed. The addition of a V6 to the lineup not only lops a full second off the TSX's acceleration performance, but it also relieves that, "C'mon already" feeling that tainted the driving experience before. The V6 doesn't feel racy-quick, but simply appropriately quick for a car of the TSX's stature and mission.
                            The previously numb steering has become weightier and more adept at telling the enthusiastic driver what's happening where the rubber meets the road, helping to make the chassis feel far more stable and confident at higher speeds. It no longer feels like a digital device for making the car change direction.
                            Unfortunately, the car's tire-sourced road roar and subpar brakes still need some improvement. It seems like a summer tire option would address both of those related concerns simultaneously. One more midcycle refresh, and the TSX will go back on my backyard barbecue recommendation list.
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                            • 2009 Acura TSX !

                              http://www.motortrend.com/roadtests/...iew/index.html

                              With the recent introduction of the more-powerful V-6 model, one starts to question the place of the four-cylinder Acura TSX. Adding those two extra cylinders only costs 3 mpg in the city and on the highway, but gives you so much more power. On the other hand, that power adds almost $6000 to the TSX’s base price, so is it worth it?

                              2009 Acura TSX Four-Cylinder may not have the power of the V-6 model, but it's still a sporty commuter.

                              For the enthusiast, we say yes. The V-6 knocks a full second off the TSX’s 0 to 60 time and nearly as much off the quarter-mile. Numbers aside, the V-6 TSX is a more compelling ride, and after being spoiled by it, many of our staff came away from the four-cylinder car disappointed. The V-6 model’s extra power and beefier tires make it that much more fun to drive when the commute ends and the twisties begin.
                              That’s not to say, though, that the four-cylinder car is bad. On the contrary, it still makes a good case for itself. Despite growing in width and length by several inches over the first-generation car, the TSX has only packed on 150 lbs in curb weight, which isn’t enough to upset the 201-hp 2.4L engine.
                              With a solid 170 lb-ft on tap, the TSX jumps off the line quickly, though the extra heft starts to catch up as the revs build. Beyond 3500 RPM, the TSX is still accelerating quickly but no longer feels like it. In fact, it doesn’t feel like much is happening at all, aside from a lot of noise being generated. Things don’t get interesting again until you’re almost at redline, but it’s no night-and-day difference, either.


                              CLICK TO VIEW GALLERY


                              The 2009 Acura TSX is powered by a standard 201-hp 2.4L four-cylinder engine. A V-6 engine is optional.











                              The real fun is to be found in Honda’s excellent five-speed automatic. Yes, some might argue it’s missing a cog, but the only time you might notice is if you get a little too excited with the upshift paddle. Unlike many other shift-able automatics, there’s no messing with the gear select. All the work is done on the steering wheel. More importantly, you do all the work. The TSX is happy to let you hold your gear all the way to redline and get the maximum performance out of the engine every time, which in a small way helps make up for the lack of power and its extra weight when you’re pushing the car hard.

                              What doesn’t help, though, is the steering. We’ve complained in the past that the TSX’s steering felt light and lifeless, but this latest tester was especially bad, enough so that we almost wonder if it was an anomaly. Around town, it’s simply too light, but take it up a twisty road and you’ll find yourself fighting the power steering around every turn. Every time you turn the wheel, if only to correct your line mid-turn, it feels like you’re driving through tar. Any information the already-numb steering would’ve given you about what the front tires are doing is lost in a wave of frustration as you wrestle with the wheel. It’s a shame, too, because the steering is incredibly precise and the car handles very well, only to be let down by its atrocious feel.
                              There’s one surefire way to avoid this problem, though -- don’t drive it hard. Save your race-driver ambitions for the sportier V-6 model and you’ll likely never be bothered by the steering. Indeed, many on our staff didn’t even notice any issue with the steering beyond the lightness on their daily commutes. Around town and on the freeway, the TSX is a quick and agile car, though its tight suspension does make the ride slightly harsh.
                              You probably won’t mind the ride too much, however, given the TSX’s front buckets, which are comfortable and supportive. The rear seats are quite agreeable as well, though adults should not use the center seat. While the second-generation TSX still leaves little in the way of rear-seat legroom, enough material has been carved out of the backs of the front seats to keep you from eating your knees.

                              Back up front, the steering wheel is meaty and comfortable; most controls are in easy reach; the gauges are reminiscent of those you might find in a Mercedes; and the extensive use of soft-touch materials makes for a comfortable and quiet cabin. Unfortunately, the dash, steering wheel, and center stack all look as though they’ve been lifted from a Honda Accord and spruced up a little, hurting the car’s premium image. The big navigation system control knob protrudes oddly from the center of the dash and requires the driver to lean forward to reach it comfortably. That makes adjusting the nav or radio while driving a bit trickier than it should be, especially since using the system takes some practice. The screen itself is buried in the dash to keep the sun off of it, and while it’s much closer to the driver’s line of sight, it also feels very far away, making passengers unconsciously lean forward to read it better.



                              CLICK TO VIEW GALLERY


                              While still edgy and controversial, the TSX is definitely better looking than its TL stablemate.
                              On its own, the four-cylinder TSX is a good commuter and reasonably good corner-carver. Next to its V-6 powered sibling, though, it’s nothing to get excited about. If those extra 3 miles per gallon in town and on the highway are what matters to you, you can’t go wrong with the base TSX. In fact, a weekend full of errand-running all over town drained only one-quarter of the TSX’s tank. If you want your car to be as sporty as it is practical, though, the V-6 is the one for you. It’s better looking than the TL, and if you opt for the V-6, it’s faster, too.



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                              • 2010 Acura TSX V6 - Short Take Road Test !

                                http://www.caranddriver.com/reviews/...take_road_test

                                Around here, we are all big fans of the Acura TSX—the lean, frisky three-time 10Best-winning first-generation version, anyway. With respect to the larger, more substantial second-gen 2009 TSX introduced last year, our camp is split. Some of us believe that even despite the car’s newer and larger (but just 130 pounds heavier) body, the high-revving 201-hp, 2.4-liter four-cylinder carried over is still a great match, offering an excellent blend of power and prudence, especially with the available six-speed manual. The rest believe that along with the newfound size and substance, Acura should have added a heap of horsepower—and rear- or all-wheel drive.
                                In regard to the former group, nothing has changed on the four-cylinder TSX for 2010. It’s still the happy front-drive, near-luxe sedan it’s always been. For the power-hungry bunch, the 2010 TSX V-6 will alleviate the horsepower deficit when it goes on sale in July. By slipping in the same 3.5-liter V-6 from the base TL—tuned in the TSX to 280 hp and 254 lb-ft of torque—Acura turns its smallest four-door into a very quick sports sedan, even if it comes only with a paddle-shifted, five-speed automatic transmission.
                                Specifications:


                                VEHICLE TYPE: front-engine, front-wheel-drive, 5-passenger, 4-door sedan

                                PRICE AS TESTED: $38.760 (base price: $35,660)

                                ENGINE TYPE: SOHC 24-valve V-6, aluminum block and heads, port fuel injection
                                Displacement: 212 cu in, 3471cc
                                Power (SAE net): 280 bhp @ 6200 rpm
                                Torque (SAE net): 254 lb-ft @ 5000 rpm

                                TRANSMISSION: 5-speed automatic with manumatic shifting
                                DIMENSIONS:
                                Wheelbase: 106.4 in Length: 185.6 in Width: 72.4 in Height: 56.7 in Curb weight (C/D est): 3650 lb


                                PERFORMANCE (C/D EST):

                                Zero to 60 mph: 6.1 sec
                                Zero to 100 mph: 15.6 sec
                                Zero to 120 mph: 28.3 sec
                                Street start, 5–60 mph: 6.3 sec
                                Standing ¼-mile: 14.7 sec @ 97 mph
                                Top speed (governor limited): 131 mph
                                Braking, 70–0 mph: 188 ft
                                Roadholding, 300-ft-dia skidpad: 0.85 g

                                FUEL ECONOMY:

                                EPA city/highway driving: 18/27 mpg
                                C/D observed: 25 mpg



                                How quick is it? Well, we’ll have to wait until we track-test it to say for certain. Acura claims it is capable of hitting 60 mph in seven seconds. But considering we hit 60 in 6.7 seconds with the last manual-equipped four-cylinder TSX we tested, we’re sure Acura is waaaaaay off with that silly estimate. Stay tuned.

                                Keep Your Hands on the Wheel:

                                But, alas, as the saying goes, with power comes responsibility. And in this case, the driver must be responsible for managing the V-6 model’s extra thrust—and 200-plus pounds of additional beef, most of which takes up residence over the front wheels. With its 62/38-percent front-to-rear weight distribution, this is a recipe for eminent understeer. And sure enough, our preview drive on some of the most challenging mountain roads through Malibu, California—with almost no runoff room and few guardrails—provided us with more than a few intestine-twisting moments. We came to realize that the V-6 model truly isn’t as tossable as the four-cylinder, despite Acura’s fitment of flared-spoke 18-inch wheels (one inch larger than those on the four-banger) and firmer front shocks. Torque steer, however, is well managed, considering how much power is being dumped on the front axle. After all, the front tires have to steer, too.
                                The brakes were also worked up a bit, with a new master cylinder, brake booster, and uprated rear brake pads. The pedal, however, still exhibited some slop in the first inch or so of travel, and that only got worse during our admittedly harsh flogging. We also saw considerable fade. In every other respect, however, the TSX is unchanged. The only exterior alterations involve the aforementioned wheels, a slightly revised front fascia, and the V-6 badge on the trunk. Inside, other than a new active-noise-cancellation system, there is no difference whatsoever. And that’s just fine with us. The comfortable, spacious, and exceedingly well-equipped interior is one of the TSX’s stronger suits, especially dressed in a dark color and equipped with the Tech package and its solar-sensing climate-control system, 10-speaker ELS surround-sound stereo, and navigation with real-time traffic reporting.

                                Steep Price for Power:

                                Well, there is one more difference: price. At $35,660, the TSX V-6 will cost a monstrous $5540 more than the $30,120 2010 TSX four-cylinder that’s available now. That’s right, two extra cylinders will run a guy nearly $2800 each. That’s especially notable given that the TSX has proven it can do its job just fine with the four it was born with, to say nothing of that engine’s clear fuel-economy advantage (21 mpg city/30 mpg highway versus 18/27).
                                Hmm. So how much is all that power—and understeer—really worth to ya?

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